LING380 - Semantics I

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Semantics I
Term
2020C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
LING
Section number only
401
Section ID
LING380401
Course number integer
380
Registration notes
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Meeting times
MW 01:00 PM-02:30 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Florian Schwarz
Description
This course provides an introduction to formal semantics for natural language. The main aim is to develop a semantic system that provides a compositional interpretation of natural language sentences. We discuss various of the aspects central to meaning composition, including function application, modification, quantification, and binding, as well as issues in the syntax-semantics interface. The basic formal tools relevant for semantic analysis, including set theory, propositional logic, and predicate logic are also introduced.
Course number only
380
Cross listings
LING580401
Use local description
No

LING310 - History of English Lang

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
1
Title (text only)
History of English Lang
Term
2020C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
LING
Section number only
001
Section ID
LING310001
Course number integer
310
Registration notes
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Meeting times
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Donald A Ringe
Description
This course traces the linguistic history of English from its earliest reconstructable ancestor, Proto-Indo-European, to the present. We focus especially on significant large-scale changes, such as the restructuring of the verb system in Proto-Germanic, the intricate interaction of sound changes in the immediate prehistory of Old English, syntactic change in Middle English, and the diversification of English dialects since 1750.
Course number only
310
Use local description
No

LING304 - Neurolinguistics

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Neurolinguistics
Term
2020C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
LING
Section number only
401
Section ID
LING304401
Course number integer
304
Registration notes
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Meeting times
TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Kathryn Schuler
Description
This course is an upper level undergraduate/graduate seminar in neurolinguistics. We will explore language in the brain through readings and discussions.
Course number only
304
Cross listings
LING504401
Use local description
No

LING300 - Tutorial in Linguistics

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
301
Title (text only)
Tutorial in Linguistics
Term
2020C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
LING
Section number only
301
Section ID
LING300301
Course number integer
300
Registration notes
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Meeting times
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Julie Legate
Description
This tutorial allows students to deal in a concentrated manner with selected major topics in linguistics by means of extensive readings and research. Two topics are studied during the semester, exposing students to a range of sophisticated linguistic questions. Senior status or permission of the instructor to enroll. Majors only.
Course number only
300
Use local description
No

LING295 - Thinking with Models

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
1
Title (text only)
Thinking with Models
Term
2020C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
LING
Section number only
001
Section ID
LING295001
Course number integer
295
Registration notes
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Meeting times
TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Robin L. Clark
Description
When a flu pandemic strikes, who should get vaccinated first? What's our best strategy for minimizing the damage of global climate change? Why is Philadelphia racially segregated? Why do most sexually reproducing species have two sexes, in roughly even proportions? These and many other scientific and practical problems require us to get a handle on complex systems. And an important part of deepening our understanding and sharpening our intuitions requires us to think with models, that is, to use models in our deliberations about what to believe and what to do.Modeling is the construction and analysis of idealized representations of real-world phenomena. This practice is ubiquitous across the sciences, and enters into many practical decisions from setting international policy to making everyday business decisions. The principal aim of this course is to acquaint students with the modeling process and, especially, to help students learn how to think critically about modeling results, as well as how to construct, analyze, and verify such models. Students who take this course will learn about the varied practices of modeling, and will learn how to construct, analyze, and validate models. Most importantly, students who take this course will learn how to critically evaluate the predictions and explanations generated by models, whatever the source of these results. While we will familiarize students with a variety of types of models, our primary focus will be on computer simulations, as they are increasingly relied upon for scientific research and practical deliberation. In addition to studying general methodological discussions about modeling, this will be a "hands on," laboratory-based course. Students will practice manipulating, modifying, and analyzing models, as well as constructing models from scratch. The conduct of the course will be heavily influenced by SAIL (structured active in-class learning) ideas. As such, in most class meetings there will be a short lecture and Q&A session, followed by individual and group exercises, which will be discussed later in the class. As an essential feature of learning about modeling we will actually design and build (program) models, which we then study. NetLogo will be the main programming environment. Students will learn to program in it and build agent-based models. NetLogo was designed to be easy to learn and we assume no prior programming experience. For approximately the first 2/3 of the course we will focus on learning NetLogo and building and analyzing models in it. During approximately the last 1/3 of the semester, students will work on their term projects and the course presentations will focus on modeling
Course number only
295
Use local description
No

LING270 - Language Acquisition

Status
C
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
1
Title (text only)
Language Acquisition
Term
2020C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
LING
Section number only
001
Section ID
LING270001
Course number integer
270
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Meeting times
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Charles Yang
Description
An introduction to language acquisition in children and the development of related cognitive and perceptual systems. Topics include the nature of speech perception and the specialization to the native language; the structure and acquisition of words; children's phonology; the development of grammar; bilingualism and second language acquisition; language learning impairments; the biological basis of language acquisition; the role in language learning in language change. Intended for any undergraduate interested in the psychology and development of language.
Course number only
270
Use local description
No

LING250 - Introduction To Syntax

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
1
Title (text only)
Introduction To Syntax
Term
2020C
Subject area
LING
Section number only
001
Section ID
LING250001
Course number integer
250
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Meeting times
MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Beatrice Santorini
Description
This course is an introduction to current syntactic theory, covering the principles that govern phrase structure (the composition of phrases and sentences), movement (dependencies between syntactic constituents), and binding (the interpretation of different types of noun phrases). Although much of the evidence discussed in the class will come from English, evidence from other languages will also play an important role, in keeping with the comparative and universalist perspective of modern syntactic theory.
Course number only
250
Use local description
No

LING220 - Phonetics I

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Phonetics I
Term
2020C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
LING
Section number only
401
Section ID
LING220401
Course number integer
220
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Meeting times
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Jianjing Kuang
Description
This course focuses on experimental investigations of speech sounds. General contents include: the fundamentals of speech production and perception; speech analysis tools and techniques; and topics in phonetic studies. The course consists of integrated lectures and laboratory sessions in which students learn computer techniques for analyzing digital recordings.
Course number only
220
Cross listings
LING520401
Use local description
No

LING217 - Origins & Evol of Lang

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
301
Title (text only)
Origins & Evol of Lang
Term
2020C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
LING
Section number only
301
Section ID
LING217301
Course number integer
217
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Meeting times
MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Gareth Roberts
Description
While communication is abundant throughout the living world, the human system we call language seems to stand out. Indeed, if humans themselves can be said to stand out among other species on Earth, it may well be language that played the crucial role in getting us here. So where does language come from? This question has been dubbed the hardest problem in science, but the last three decades have seen a notable renaissance in scientific attempts to answer it. This seminar will examine both the results of this multidisciplinary endeavor and the tools that have been employed in it. It will involve discussions of the nature of language and its place among other communication systems and will touch on fundamental questions of what it means to be human.
Course number only
217
Use local description
No

LING175 - Lang, Cog and Culture

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
1
Title (text only)
Lang, Cog and Culture
Term
2020C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
LING
Section number only
001
Section ID
LING175001
Course number integer
175
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Meeting times
MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Anna Papafragou
Description
This is a course on how language relates to other cognitive systems. We will discuss the question of whether and how the language one speaks affects the way one thinks, the relation between words and concepts, the link between language acquisition and conceptual development in children, and the potential role of language in shaping uniquely human concepts. The course incorporates cross-linguistic, cross-cultural and developmental perspectives and combines readings from linguistics, psychology, philosophy, neuroscience and other fields within cognitive science.
Course number only
175
Use local description
No