LING150 - Sentence Structure

Status
X
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
1
Title (text only)
Sentence Structure
Term
2020C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
LING
Section number only
001
Section ID
LING150001
Course number integer
150
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Meeting times
CANCELED
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Donald A Ringe
Description
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic concepts of sentence structure in a "pretheoretical" framework, demonstrating that any natural human language must have certain structures and must choose the rest from a restricted universal set. The textbook, which was written for this course, discusses each set of structures with examples from six languages: English, Spanish, Latin, Biblical Hebrew, Mandarin, and Navajo. The instructor will add languages from among those with which the students are familiar, within the limits of his competence. This course will help students not only to learn foreign languages, but also to improve their own writing skills, by making the structures that they must use more explicit and intelligible.
Course number only
150
Use local description
No

LING115 - Writing Systems

Status
O
Activity
REC
Section number integer
202
Title (text only)
Writing Systems
Term
2020C
Subject area
LING
Section number only
202
Section ID
LING115202
Course number integer
115
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
Meeting times
F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Description
The historical origin of writing in Sumer, Egypt, China, and Mesoamerica; the transmission of writing across languages and cultures, including the route from Phoenician to Greek to Etruscan to Latin to English; the development of individual writing systems over time; the traditional classification of written symbols (ideographic, logographic, syllabic, alphabetic); methods of decipherment; differences between spoken and written language; how linguistic structure influences writing, and is reflected by it; social and political aspects of writing; literacy and the acquisition of writing.
Course number only
115
Use local description
No

LING115 - Writing Systems

Status
O
Activity
REC
Section number integer
201
Title (text only)
Writing Systems
Term
2020C
Subject area
LING
Section number only
201
Section ID
LING115201
Course number integer
115
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
Meeting times
F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM
Level
undergraduate
Description
The historical origin of writing in Sumer, Egypt, China, and Mesoamerica; the transmission of writing across languages and cultures, including the route from Phoenician to Greek to Etruscan to Latin to English; the development of individual writing systems over time; the traditional classification of written symbols (ideographic, logographic, syllabic, alphabetic); methods of decipherment; differences between spoken and written language; how linguistic structure influences writing, and is reflected by it; social and political aspects of writing; literacy and the acquisition of writing.
Course number only
115
Use local description
No

LING115 - Writing Systems

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
1
Title (text only)
Writing Systems
Term
2020C
Subject area
LING
Section number only
001
Section ID
LING115001
Course number integer
115
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
Meeting times
MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Eugene Buckley
Description
The historical origin of writing in Sumer, Egypt, China, and Mesoamerica; the transmission of writing across languages and cultures, including the route from Phoenician to Greek to Etruscan to Latin to English; the development of individual writing systems over time; the traditional classification of written symbols (ideographic, logographic, syllabic, alphabetic); methods of decipherment; differences between spoken and written language; how linguistic structure influences writing, and is reflected by it; social and political aspects of writing; literacy and the acquisition of writing.
Course number only
115
Fulfills
History & Tradition Sector
Use local description
No

LING105 - Introduction To Cognitive Science

Status
C
Activity
REC
Section number integer
412
Title (text only)
Introduction To Cognitive Science
Term
2020C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
LING
Section number only
412
Section ID
LING105412
Course number integer
105
Registration notes
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
Meeting times
R 03:00 PM-04:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Catherine O Kolski
Description
How do minds work? This course surveys a wide range of answers to this question from disciplines ranging from philosophy to neuroscience. The course devotes special attention to the use of simple computational and mathematical models. Topics include perception, learning, memory, decision making, emotion and consciousness. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. It is a requirement for the BA in Cognitive Science, the BAS in Computer and Cognitive Science, and the minor in Cognitive Science, and it is recommended for students taking the dual degree in Computer and Cognitive Science.
Course number only
105
Cross listings
PSYC207412, CIS140412, COGS001412
Fulfills
Formal Reasoning Course
Use local description
No

LING105 - Introduction To Cognitive Science

Status
O
Activity
REC
Section number integer
411
Title (text only)
Introduction To Cognitive Science
Term
2020C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
LING
Section number only
411
Section ID
LING105411
Course number integer
105
Registration notes
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
Meeting times
F 05:00 PM-06:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Shanna T Edwards
Description
How do minds work? This course surveys a wide range of answers to this question from disciplines ranging from philosophy to neuroscience. The course devotes special attention to the use of simple computational and mathematical models. Topics include perception, learning, memory, decision making, emotion and consciousness. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. It is a requirement for the BA in Cognitive Science, the BAS in Computer and Cognitive Science, and the minor in Cognitive Science, and it is recommended for students taking the dual degree in Computer and Cognitive Science.
Course number only
105
Cross listings
CIS140411, PSYC207411, COGS001411
Fulfills
Formal Reasoning Course
Use local description
No

LING105 - Introduction To Cognitive Science

Status
O
Activity
REC
Section number integer
410
Title (text only)
Introduction To Cognitive Science
Term
2020C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
LING
Section number only
410
Section ID
LING105410
Course number integer
105
Registration notes
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
Meeting times
F 04:00 PM-05:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Long Ni
Description
How do minds work? This course surveys a wide range of answers to this question from disciplines ranging from philosophy to neuroscience. The course devotes special attention to the use of simple computational and mathematical models. Topics include perception, learning, memory, decision making, emotion and consciousness. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. It is a requirement for the BA in Cognitive Science, the BAS in Computer and Cognitive Science, and the minor in Cognitive Science, and it is recommended for students taking the dual degree in Computer and Cognitive Science.
Course number only
105
Cross listings
CIS140410, PSYC207410, COGS001410
Fulfills
Formal Reasoning Course
Use local description
No

LING105 - Introduction To Cognitive Science

Status
O
Activity
REC
Section number integer
409
Title (text only)
Introduction To Cognitive Science
Term
2020C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
LING
Section number only
409
Section ID
LING105409
Course number integer
105
Registration notes
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
Meeting times
F 03:00 PM-04:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Nicole Chau
Description
How do minds work? This course surveys a wide range of answers to this question from disciplines ranging from philosophy to neuroscience. The course devotes special attention to the use of simple computational and mathematical models. Topics include perception, learning, memory, decision making, emotion and consciousness. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. It is a requirement for the BA in Cognitive Science, the BAS in Computer and Cognitive Science, and the minor in Cognitive Science, and it is recommended for students taking the dual degree in Computer and Cognitive Science.
Course number only
105
Cross listings
CIS140409, PSYC207409, COGS001409
Fulfills
Formal Reasoning Course
Use local description
No

LING105 - Introduction To Cognitive Science

Status
O
Activity
REC
Section number integer
408
Title (text only)
Introduction To Cognitive Science
Term
2020C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
LING
Section number only
408
Section ID
LING105408
Course number integer
105
Registration notes
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
Meeting times
F 03:00 PM-04:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Nicholas L Plante
Description
How do minds work? This course surveys a wide range of answers to this question from disciplines ranging from philosophy to neuroscience. The course devotes special attention to the use of simple computational and mathematical models. Topics include perception, learning, memory, decision making, emotion and consciousness. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. It is a requirement for the BA in Cognitive Science, the BAS in Computer and Cognitive Science, and the minor in Cognitive Science, and it is recommended for students taking the dual degree in Computer and Cognitive Science.
Course number only
105
Cross listings
CIS140408, PSYC207408, COGS001408
Fulfills
Formal Reasoning Course
Use local description
No

LING105 - Introduction To Cognitive Science

Status
C
Activity
REC
Section number integer
407
Title (text only)
Introduction To Cognitive Science
Term
2020C
Syllabus URL
Subject area
LING
Section number only
407
Section ID
LING105407
Course number integer
105
Registration notes
Crse Online: Sync & Async Components
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
Meeting times
R 06:00 PM-07:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Description
How do minds work? This course surveys a wide range of answers to this question from disciplines ranging from philosophy to neuroscience. The course devotes special attention to the use of simple computational and mathematical models. Topics include perception, learning, memory, decision making, emotion and consciousness. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. It is a requirement for the BA in Cognitive Science, the BAS in Computer and Cognitive Science, and the minor in Cognitive Science, and it is recommended for students taking the dual degree in Computer and Cognitive Science.
Course number only
105
Cross listings
CIS140407, PSYC207407, COGS001407
Fulfills
Formal Reasoning Course
Use local description
No