Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
LING 001-001 Intro To Linguistics Gareth Roberts ANNS 110 MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Natural Science & Math Sector
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=LING001001
LING 001-201 Introduction To Linguistics Ruicong Sun WILL 315 R 10:15 AM-11:15 AM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 001-202 Introduction To Linguistics Gwendolyn Dingle Hildebrandt WILL 319 R 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 001-203 Introduction To Linguistics Aini Li WILL 316 R 10:15 AM-11:15 AM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 001-204 Introduction To Linguistics Aini Li WILL 1 R 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 001-205 Introduction To Linguistics Gwendolyn Dingle Hildebrandt WILL 315 F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 001-206 Introduction To Linguistics Ruicong Sun WILL 315 F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 001-207 Introduction To Linguistics Ugurcan Vurgun WILL 316 F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 001-208 Introduction To Linguistics Ugurcan Vurgun WILL 316 F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 105-401 Introduction To Cognitive Science John C. Trueswell
Charles Yang
STIT B6 TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM How do minds work? This course surveys a wide range of answers to this question from disciplines ranging from philosophy to neuroscience. The course devotes special attention to the use of simple computational and mathematical models. Topics include perception, learning, memory, decision making, emotion and consciousness. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. It is a requirement for the BA in Cognitive Science, the BAS in Computer and Cognitive Science, and the minor in Cognitive Science, and it is recommended for students taking the dual degree in Computer and Cognitive Science. CIS140401, PSYC207401, PHIL044401, COGS001401 Formal Reasoning Course Natural Science & Math Sector
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
LING 105-402 Introduction To Cognitive Science WILL 316 R 03:30 PM-04:30 PM How do minds work? This course surveys a wide range of answers to this question from disciplines ranging from philosophy to neuroscience. The course devotes special attention to the use of simple computational and mathematical models. Topics include perception, learning, memory, decision making, emotion and consciousness. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. It is a requirement for the BA in Cognitive Science, the BAS in Computer and Cognitive Science, and the minor in Cognitive Science, and it is recommended for students taking the dual degree in Computer and Cognitive Science. CIS140402, PSYC207402, PHIL044402, COGS001402 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 105-403 Introduction To Cognitive Science Ekaterina Yuryevna Goncharova MEYH B5 R 03:30 PM-04:30 PM How do minds work? This course surveys a wide range of answers to this question from disciplines ranging from philosophy to neuroscience. The course devotes special attention to the use of simple computational and mathematical models. Topics include perception, learning, memory, decision making, emotion and consciousness. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. It is a requirement for the BA in Cognitive Science, the BAS in Computer and Cognitive Science, and the minor in Cognitive Science, and it is recommended for students taking the dual degree in Computer and Cognitive Science. CIS140403, PSYC207403, PHIL044403, COGS001403 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 105-404 Introduction To Cognitive Science Maya S Davidov WILL 24 R 03:30 PM-04:30 PM How do minds work? This course surveys a wide range of answers to this question from disciplines ranging from philosophy to neuroscience. The course devotes special attention to the use of simple computational and mathematical models. Topics include perception, learning, memory, decision making, emotion and consciousness. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. It is a requirement for the BA in Cognitive Science, the BAS in Computer and Cognitive Science, and the minor in Cognitive Science, and it is recommended for students taking the dual degree in Computer and Cognitive Science. CIS140404, PSYC207404, PHIL044404, COGS001404 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 105-405 Introduction To Cognitive Science WILL 305 R 03:30 PM-04:30 PM How do minds work? This course surveys a wide range of answers to this question from disciplines ranging from philosophy to neuroscience. The course devotes special attention to the use of simple computational and mathematical models. Topics include perception, learning, memory, decision making, emotion and consciousness. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. It is a requirement for the BA in Cognitive Science, the BAS in Computer and Cognitive Science, and the minor in Cognitive Science, and it is recommended for students taking the dual degree in Computer and Cognitive Science. CIS140405, PSYC207405, PHIL044405, COGS001405 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 105-406 Introduction To Cognitive Science WILL 4 R 05:15 PM-06:15 PM How do minds work? This course surveys a wide range of answers to this question from disciplines ranging from philosophy to neuroscience. The course devotes special attention to the use of simple computational and mathematical models. Topics include perception, learning, memory, decision making, emotion and consciousness. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. It is a requirement for the BA in Cognitive Science, the BAS in Computer and Cognitive Science, and the minor in Cognitive Science, and it is recommended for students taking the dual degree in Computer and Cognitive Science. CIS140406, PSYC207406, PHIL044406, COGS001406 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 105-407 Introduction To Cognitive Science Serena Zhang WILL 316 R 05:15 PM-06:15 PM How do minds work? This course surveys a wide range of answers to this question from disciplines ranging from philosophy to neuroscience. The course devotes special attention to the use of simple computational and mathematical models. Topics include perception, learning, memory, decision making, emotion and consciousness. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. It is a requirement for the BA in Cognitive Science, the BAS in Computer and Cognitive Science, and the minor in Cognitive Science, and it is recommended for students taking the dual degree in Computer and Cognitive Science. CIS140407, PSYC207407, PHIL044407, COGS001407 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 105-408 Introduction To Cognitive Science Simrat Kaur Kohli WILL 5 F 03:30 PM-04:30 PM How do minds work? This course surveys a wide range of answers to this question from disciplines ranging from philosophy to neuroscience. The course devotes special attention to the use of simple computational and mathematical models. Topics include perception, learning, memory, decision making, emotion and consciousness. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. It is a requirement for the BA in Cognitive Science, the BAS in Computer and Cognitive Science, and the minor in Cognitive Science, and it is recommended for students taking the dual degree in Computer and Cognitive Science. CIS140408, PSYC207408, PHIL044408, COGS001408 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 105-409 Introduction To Cognitive Science Catherine O Kolski WILL 315 F 03:30 PM-04:30 PM How do minds work? This course surveys a wide range of answers to this question from disciplines ranging from philosophy to neuroscience. The course devotes special attention to the use of simple computational and mathematical models. Topics include perception, learning, memory, decision making, emotion and consciousness. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. It is a requirement for the BA in Cognitive Science, the BAS in Computer and Cognitive Science, and the minor in Cognitive Science, and it is recommended for students taking the dual degree in Computer and Cognitive Science. CIS140409, PSYC207409, PHIL044409, COGS001409 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 105-410 Introduction To Cognitive Science Sylvia Y Zhao GLAB 102 F 03:30 PM-04:30 PM How do minds work? This course surveys a wide range of answers to this question from disciplines ranging from philosophy to neuroscience. The course devotes special attention to the use of simple computational and mathematical models. Topics include perception, learning, memory, decision making, emotion and consciousness. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. It is a requirement for the BA in Cognitive Science, the BAS in Computer and Cognitive Science, and the minor in Cognitive Science, and it is recommended for students taking the dual degree in Computer and Cognitive Science. CIS140410, PSYC207410, PHIL044410, COGS001410 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 105-411 Introduction To Cognitive Science Victor Gomes WILL 316 F 05:15 PM-06:15 PM How do minds work? This course surveys a wide range of answers to this question from disciplines ranging from philosophy to neuroscience. The course devotes special attention to the use of simple computational and mathematical models. Topics include perception, learning, memory, decision making, emotion and consciousness. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. It is a requirement for the BA in Cognitive Science, the BAS in Computer and Cognitive Science, and the minor in Cognitive Science, and it is recommended for students taking the dual degree in Computer and Cognitive Science. CIS140411, PSYC207411, PHIL044411, COGS001411 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 105-412 Introduction To Cognitive Science Nicholas L Plante WILL 4 R 03:30 PM-04:30 PM How do minds work? This course surveys a wide range of answers to this question from disciplines ranging from philosophy to neuroscience. The course devotes special attention to the use of simple computational and mathematical models. Topics include perception, learning, memory, decision making, emotion and consciousness. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. It is a requirement for the BA in Cognitive Science, the BAS in Computer and Cognitive Science, and the minor in Cognitive Science, and it is recommended for students taking the dual degree in Computer and Cognitive Science. PSYC207412, PHIL044412, COGS001412 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 115-001 Writing Systems Eugene Buckley STHN AUD MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM The historical origin of writing in Sumer, Egypt, China, and Mesoamerica; the transmission of writing across languages and cultures, including the route from Phoenician to Greek to Etruscan to Latin to English; the development of individual writing systems over time; the traditional classification of written symbols (ideographic, logographic, syllabic, alphabetic); methods of decipherment; differences between spoken and written language; how linguistic structure influences writing, and is reflected by it; social and political aspects of writing; literacy and the acquisition of writing. History & Tradition Sector Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
LING 115-201 Writing Systems WILL 25 F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM The historical origin of writing in Sumer, Egypt, China, and Mesoamerica; the transmission of writing across languages and cultures, including the route from Phoenician to Greek to Etruscan to Latin to English; the development of individual writing systems over time; the traditional classification of written symbols (ideographic, logographic, syllabic, alphabetic); methods of decipherment; differences between spoken and written language; how linguistic structure influences writing, and is reflected by it; social and political aspects of writing; literacy and the acquisition of writing. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 115-202 Writing Systems WILL 25 F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The historical origin of writing in Sumer, Egypt, China, and Mesoamerica; the transmission of writing across languages and cultures, including the route from Phoenician to Greek to Etruscan to Latin to English; the development of individual writing systems over time; the traditional classification of written symbols (ideographic, logographic, syllabic, alphabetic); methods of decipherment; differences between spoken and written language; how linguistic structure influences writing, and is reflected by it; social and political aspects of writing; literacy and the acquisition of writing. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 125-001 The Phonetics of Music Jianjing Kuang WILL 25 TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Singing is an instance of human voice production, and as such can be studied in the way that speech is studied by speech scientists. The scientific study of singing is a small but growing field that uses methods from speech physiology and acoustics to characterize differences among singing voices and performances. This course will introduce students to methods for quantifying aspects of voice production, so that voice samples can be compared across singers, styles, etc. We will also discuss the scientific basis for some of the vocal techniques. Every aspect of voice presented in class will be explored through hands-on lab work with computer programs. We will mostly look at recorded samples of professional singers, but we will sometimes look at students' own vocal productions. However, this is not a course about improving one's singing, and no skill or talent is required to participate. Physical World Sector Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=LING125001
LING 172-401 Data Sci For Lang & Mind Kathryn Schuler MOOR 216 MW 10:15 AM-11:15 AM Data Science for studying Language and the Mind is an entry-level course designed to teach basic principles of data science to students with little or no background in statistics or computer science. Students will learn to identify patterns in data using visualizations and descriptive statistics; make predictions from data using machine learning and optimization; and quantify the certainty of their predictions using statistical models. This course aims to help students build a foundation of critical thinking and computational skills that will allow them to work with data in all fields related to the study of the mind (e.g. linguistics, psychology, philosophy, cognitive science). PSYC215401 College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Natural Science & Math Sector
Registration also required for Laboratory (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=LING172401
LING 172-402 Data Science For Studying Language and the Mind Yong June Choe BENN 222 R 10:15 AM-11:15 AM Data Science for studying Language and the Mind is an entry-level course designed to teach basic principles of data science to students with little or no background in statistics or computer science. Students will learn to identify patterns in data using visualizations and descriptive statistics; make predictions from data using machine learning and optimization; and quantify the certainty of their predictions using statistical models. This course aims to help students build a foundation of critical thinking and computational skills that will allow them to work with data in all fields related to the study of the mind (e.g. linguistics, psychology, philosophy, cognitive science). PSYC215402 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 172-403 Data Science For Studying Language and the Mind Yong June Choe BENN 222 R 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Data Science for studying Language and the Mind is an entry-level course designed to teach basic principles of data science to students with little or no background in statistics or computer science. Students will learn to identify patterns in data using visualizations and descriptive statistics; make predictions from data using machine learning and optimization; and quantify the certainty of their predictions using statistical models. This course aims to help students build a foundation of critical thinking and computational skills that will allow them to work with data in all fields related to the study of the mind (e.g. linguistics, psychology, philosophy, cognitive science). PSYC215403 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 172-404 Data Science For Studying Language and the Mind Yong June Choe DRLB 4E19 F 10:15 AM-11:15 AM Data Science for studying Language and the Mind is an entry-level course designed to teach basic principles of data science to students with little or no background in statistics or computer science. Students will learn to identify patterns in data using visualizations and descriptive statistics; make predictions from data using machine learning and optimization; and quantify the certainty of their predictions using statistical models. This course aims to help students build a foundation of critical thinking and computational skills that will allow them to work with data in all fields related to the study of the mind (e.g. linguistics, psychology, philosophy, cognitive science). PSYC215404 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 172-405 Data Science For Studying Language and the Mind Colin R Twomey DRLB 4E19 F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM Data Science for studying Language and the Mind is an entry-level course designed to teach basic principles of data science to students with little or no background in statistics or computer science. Students will learn to identify patterns in data using visualizations and descriptive statistics; make predictions from data using machine learning and optimization; and quantify the certainty of their predictions using statistical models. This course aims to help students build a foundation of critical thinking and computational skills that will allow them to work with data in all fields related to the study of the mind (e.g. linguistics, psychology, philosophy, cognitive science). PSYC215405 Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 250-001 Introduction To Syntax Beatrice Santorini EDUC 120 TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course is an introduction to current syntactic theory, covering the principles that govern phrase structure (the composition of phrases and sentences), movement (dependencies between syntactic constituents), and binding (the interpretation of different types of noun phrases). Although much of the evidence discussed in the class will come from English, evidence from other languages will also play an important role, in keeping with the comparative and universalist perspective of modern syntactic theory. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
LING 270-001 Language Acquisition Charles Yang MCNB 286-7 TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM An introduction to language acquisition in children and the development of related cognitive and perceptual systems. Topics include the nature of speech perception and the specialization to the native language; the structure and acquisition of words; children's phonology; the development of grammar; bilingualism and second language acquisition; language learning impairments; the biological basis of language acquisition; the role in language learning in language change. Intended for any undergraduate interested in the psychology and development of language. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
LING 300-301 Tutorial in Linguistics Julie Legate TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This tutorial allows students to deal in a concentrated manner with selected major topics in linguistics by means of extensive readings and research. Two topics are studied during the semester, exposing students to a range of sophisticated linguistic questions. Senior status or permission of the instructor to enroll. Majors only. Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
LING 304-401 Neurolinguistics Kathryn Schuler WLNT 300C W 03:30 PM-06:30 PM This course is an upper level undergraduate/graduate seminar in neurolinguistics. We will explore language in the brain through readings and discussions. LING504401 Undergraduates Need Permission
LING 411-301 Old English Donald A Ringe MWF 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The main purpose of this course is to teach students to read Old English ("Anglo-Saxon"), chiefly but not exclusively for research in linguistics. Grammar will be heavily emphasized; there will also be lectures on the immediate prehistory of the language, since the morphology of Old English was made unusually complex by interacting sound changes. In the first eight weeks we will work through Moore and Knott's "Elements of Grammar" and learn the grammar; the remainder of the term will be devoted to reading texts. Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
LING 455-301 Exps Study of Meaning: Experiments in the Study of Meaning Anna Papafragou WLNT 300C MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM This course provides an introduction to the experimental study of meaning in natural language. We begin by introducing some basic notions of formal semantics and pragmatics and review relevant technical background. Next we discuss recent developments in studying meaning-related phenomena experimentally, which, in addition to theoretical questions, involve issues in the acquisition and processing of semantic information. In the course of this, we will also introduce the basics of experimental design and relevant psycholinguistic methodology. In addition to readings and homework assignments, students will embark on a small research project (individually or jointly), which will be presented in class at the end of the semester and written up as a term paper. Natural Science & Math Sector
LING 504-401 Neurolinguistics Kathryn Schuler WLNT 300C W 03:30 PM-06:30 PM This course is a graduate seminar in neurolinguistics. We will explore language in the brain through readings and discussion. LING304401 Undergraduates Need Permission
Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
LING 510-001 Intro Hist-Comp Ling Donald A Ringe MWF 01:45 PM-02:45 PM Synchronic and diachronic systems. Analogic processes. Semantic change. Effects of contact. Internal reconstruction. Comparative method and reconstruction. Undergraduates Need Permission
Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
LING 517-001 Evolutionary Linguistics Gareth Roberts MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Evolutionary linguistics Scholars have been interested in the origins and evolution of language for hundreds of years, and work was published on the topic throughout the twentieth century. The end of the century, however, saw a considerable upsurge in serious scientific interest, leading to increasing interdisciplinary communication on the topic and the development of new empirical tools. This course offers an introduction to the literature in this field, bringing together research from a diverse range of disciplines, and laying out what questions remain and how they might possibly be answered. Undergraduates Need Permission https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=LING517001
LING 530-001 Phonology I Rolf Noyer WLNT 300C TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM First half of a year-long introduction to the formal study of phonology. Basic concepts in articulatory phonetics; the distribution of sounds (phonemes and allophones); underlying and surface forms, and how to relate them using both ordered-rule and surface-constraint approaches. The survey of theoretical topics in this term includes distinctive features (context, organization, underspecification); the autosegmental representation of tone; and the theory of phonological domains and their interaction with morphological and syntactic constituency. Emphasizes hands-on analysis of a wide range of data. Undergraduates Need Permission
LING 550-001 Syntax I Julie Legate WLNT 300C TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM A general introduction at the graduate level to the analysis of sentence structure. The approach taken is that of contemporary generative-transformational grammar. Undergraduates Need Permission
LING 562-301 Quan Analy Ling Variat: Quanitative Analysis of Linguistics Variation Meredith J Tamminga WLNT 300C TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course provides students with the opportunity to hone their statistical, computational, and organizational skillsets while conducting original linguistic research on data gathered in continuing fieldwork in the speech community. Topics include forced alignment and vowel extraction, auditory and automated variable coding, the application of linear and logistic regression, and techniques for effective data visualization. Undergraduates Need Permission https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2021C&course=LING562301
LING 603-301 Topics in Phonology Rolf Noyer WLNT 300C M 03:30 PM-05:30 PM Topics are chosen from such areas as featural representations; syllable theory; metrical structure; tonal phonology; prosodic morphology; interaction of phonology with syntax and morphology.
LING 620-301 Topics in Phonetics Jianjing Kuang WLNT 300C W 08:30 AM-10:30 AM Topics in Phonetics
LING 630-301 Seminar in Morphology David Scott Embick W 12:00 PM-02:00 PM Readings in modern morphological theory and evaluation of hypotheses in the light of synchronic and diachronic evidence from various languages. Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info