Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
LING 001-001 Intro To Linguistics Mark Y. Liberman ANNS 110 MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Natural Science & Math Sector
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
LING 001-201 Introduction To Linguistics Eleftherios Paparounas DRLB 2C8 R 09:30 AM-10:30 AM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 001-202 Introduction To Linguistics Eleftherios Paparounas DRLB 2C8 R 10:30 AM-11:30 AM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 001-203 Introduction To Linguistics Milena Sereikaite DRLB 3W2 R 09:30 AM-10:30 AM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 001-204 Introduction To Linguistics Milena Sereikaite DRLB 3W2 R 10:30 AM-11:30 AM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 001-205 Introduction To Linguistics Yiran Chen WILL 24 F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 001-206 Introduction To Linguistics Yiran Chen WILL 24 F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 001-207 Introduction To Linguistics Luke James Adamson WILL 23 F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 001-208 Introduction To Linguistics Luke James Adamson WILL 23 F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 055-301 Digital Science and Scholarship: Exploring Speech and Language Mark Y. Liberman CANCELED Today, research of all kinds is being extended, supplemented or replaced by computational analysis and modeling. This is happening in every field from archeology to zoology, in the humanities as well as in the natural and social sciences. And often, the phenomena of interest are viewed through the lens of language in digital form. This is directly true in literature, history, medicine, law, media studies, political science, sociology, and anthropology, among others. Related or analogous methods are used in studies of animal communication, in the analysis of musical scores or recordings, and so on. In this seminar, we will learn about research at Penn and elsewhere based on a wide variety of digital language materials, including the texts of novels; poetry readings; student writing; political speeches; courtroom arguments; recordings of musical performances; musical scores; cuneiform tablets; clinical interviews and neurocognitive tests; legal contracts; twitter and facebook; language learning; and even birdsong. And we will explore the foundational skills and methods that support research across all of these apparently diverse domains. We'll learn that the techniques used to analyze clinical interviews can be the same as those used to analyze poetry readings; insight into political speeches may come from the same methods used to analyze novels. Students with all backgrounds and interests are welcome. Priority in enrollment will be given to students in the Digital Humanities Program in Riepe College House, and the Research, Innovation and Entrepreneurship Program in Ware College House. Formal Reasoning Course Course is available to Freshmen.
Freshman Seminar
For Freshmen Only
LING 071-680 American Sign Language I Melanie Drolsbaugh WILL 319 TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Introduction to American Sign Language ( ASL ). Introduces ASL in a contextualized and conversational manner. Course includes receptive and expressive readiness activities, sign vocabulary and grammar, and an introduction to important topics and people within Deaf communities and Deaf culture. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
LING 071-681 American Sign Language I Kaitlyn Parenti WILL 319 TR 06:00 PM-07:30 PM Introduction to American Sign Language ( ASL ). Introduces ASL in a contextualized and conversational manner. Course includes receptive and expressive readiness activities, sign vocabulary and grammar, and an introduction to important topics and people within Deaf communities and Deaf culture. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
LING 071-682 American Sign Language I Melanie Drolsbaugh WILL 319 TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Introduction to American Sign Language ( ASL ). Introduces ASL in a contextualized and conversational manner. Course includes receptive and expressive readiness activities, sign vocabulary and grammar, and an introduction to important topics and people within Deaf communities and Deaf culture. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
LING 071-683 American Sign Language I Jennifer Kay Strunk WILL 202 MW 05:00 PM-06:30 PM Introduction to American Sign Language ( ASL ). Introduces ASL in a contextualized and conversational manner. Course includes receptive and expressive readiness activities, sign vocabulary and grammar, and an introduction to important topics and people within Deaf communities and Deaf culture. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
LING 071-684 American Sign Language I Melanie Drolsbaugh WILL 29 MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM Introduction to American Sign Language ( ASL ). Introduces ASL in a contextualized and conversational manner. Course includes receptive and expressive readiness activities, sign vocabulary and grammar, and an introduction to important topics and people within Deaf communities and Deaf culture.
LING 072-680 Amer Sign Language II Kaitlyn Parenti CANCELED Increased communication skill in American Sign Language (ASL). Expressive and receptive abilities are expanded upon via a contextualized and conversational manner Important topics to Deaf communities and Deaf culture are continued within online and in-class discussion. Penn Language Center Permission Needed
Prior Language Experience Required
LING 072-681 Amer Sign Language II Sarah Ruth WILL 205 MW 05:00 PM-06:30 PM Increased communication skill in American Sign Language (ASL). Expressive and receptive abilities are expanded upon via a contextualized and conversational manner Important topics to Deaf communities and Deaf culture are continued within online and in-class discussion. Penn Language Center Permission Needed
Prior Language Experience Required
LING 073-680 Amer Sign Language III Joshua Beckman WILL 305 MW 05:00 PM-06:30 PM American Sign Language (ASL) at the Intermediate I level. Expressive and receptive abilities are expanded upon via a contextualized and conversational manner, including, but not limited to, narrative production. Important topics to Deaf communities and Deaf culture are continued within online and in-class discussion. Penn Language Center Permission Needed
Prior Language Experience Required
LING 073-681 Amer Sign Language III Joshua Beckman WILL 304 MW 06:30 PM-08:00 PM American Sign Language (ASL) at the Intermediate I level. Expressive and receptive abilities are expanded upon via a contextualized and conversational manner, including, but not limited to, narrative production. Important topics to Deaf communities and Deaf culture are continued within online and in-class discussion. Penn Language Center Permission Needed
Prior Language Experience Required
LING 073-682 Amer Sign Language III Christy Hennessey WILL 27 TR 04:30 PM-06:00 PM American Sign Language (ASL) at the Intermediate I level. Expressive and receptive abilities are expanded upon via a contextualized and conversational manner, including, but not limited to, narrative production. Important topics to Deaf communities and Deaf culture are continued within online and in-class discussion. Penn Language Center Permission Needed
Prior Language Experience Required
LING 074-680 Amer Sign Language IV Christy Hennessey WILL 27 TR 06:00 PM-07:30 PM American Sign Language (ASL) at the Intermediate II level. Expressive and receptive abilities are expanded upon via a contextualized and conversational manner, including, but not limited to, narrative production. Important topics to Deaf communities and Deaf culture are continued within online and in-class discussion. Penn Language Center Permission Needed
Prior Language Experience Required
LING 075-680 Amer Sign Language V Jami N. Fisher WILL 705 TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This is an advanced ASL course in which students expand their conversational and narrative range. While receptive readiness activities continue to be an important part of the class, the emphasis moves toward honing expressive sign skills through narrative presentation and ASL-only class discussions. Various aspects of Deaf culture and cultural behavior rules will be incorporated into the course. A large component of the course is a unit on Deaf history in which students read and discuss major events and famous deaf people via readings, film, class lectures and discussions, and other outside resources. Penn Language Center Permission Needed
Prior Language Experience Required
LING 077-680 Asl/Deaf Studies - Abcs Jami N. Fisher WILL 633 MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM For this course, students will attend Pennsylvania School for the Deaf on a weekly basis where they will participate in and contribute to the school community via tutoring or other mutually agreeable activities. Students will also have formal class on a weekly basis with discussions and activities centering on reflection of community experiences through linguistic as well as cultural lenses. Additionally, drawing from the required Linguistics and other ASL/Deaf Studies coursework, students will develop an inquiry question and conduct preliminary community-based research to analyze sociolinguistic variations of ASL and Deaf cultural attitudes, behaviors, and norms. Ongoing reflections and discussions-formal and informal-on Deaf cultural/theoretical topics drawing from readings as well as community experiences will be integral to the course experience. LING 078, Topics in Deaf Culture and permission from the instructor, are required for this course. Penn Language Center Permission Needed
Prior Language Experience Required
LING 081-680 Beginning Irish Gaelic I Roslyn Blyn-Ladrew WILL 315 MW 05:00 PM-07:00 PM Irish Gaelic, spoken primarily on the west coast of Ireland, is rich in oral traditions, song, poetry and literature. Knowledge of this language provides a foundation to understanding Celtic folklore and linguistics and also enhances the study of Anglo-Irish literature and history. The first-year course will include reading, conversation, listening and speaking. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
LING 083-680 Inter. Irish Gaelic I Roslyn Blyn-Ladrew CANCELED Prior Language Experience Required
LING 104-001 Language and the Brain Kathryn D. Schuler CHEM 514 TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course offers an introduction to the brain basis of language. Its primary goal is to introduce students to the study of the brain and language by combining basic concepts from linguistics, psychology, cognitive science, and neuroscience. We will consider, through lectures and readings, a number of questions: What areas of the brain underlie language processing and acquisition? What are the fundamental functions of these brain areas and how do these functions overlap with other cognitive processes? How is language impacted when one of these areas is damaged? And what are the methods and approaches researchers use to examine these questions? This is an introductory course and no specific background is assumed or required. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
LING 105-401 Intro Cognitive Science Karolina M Lempert
Charles Yang
TOWN 100 TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Cognitive Science is founded on the realization that many problems in the analysis of human and artificial intelligence require an interdisciplinary approach. The course is intended to introduce students to the problems and characteristic concepts of Cognitive Science, drawing on formal and empirical approaches from the parent disciplines of computer science, linguistics, neuroscience, philosophy and psychology. The topics covered include Perception, Action, Learning, Language, Knowledge Representation, and Inference, and the relations and interactions between such modules. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact, and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories, and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. COGS001401, CIS140401, PSYC207401 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
LING 105-402 Introduction To Cognitive Science TOWN 305 R 03:00 PM-04:00 PM Cognitive Science is founded on the realization that many problems in the analysis of human and artificial intelligence require an interdisciplinary approach. The course is intended to introduce students to the problems and characteristic concepts of Cognitive Science, drawing on formal and empirical approaches from the parent disciplines of computer science, linguistics, neuroscience, philosophy and psychology. The topics covered include Perception, Action, Learning, Language, Knowledge Representation, and Inference, and the relations and interactions between such modules. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact, and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories, and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. COGS001402, CIS140402, PSYC207402 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 105-403 Introduction To Cognitive Science DRLB 3C2 R 03:00 PM-04:00 PM Cognitive Science is founded on the realization that many problems in the analysis of human and artificial intelligence require an interdisciplinary approach. The course is intended to introduce students to the problems and characteristic concepts of Cognitive Science, drawing on formal and empirical approaches from the parent disciplines of computer science, linguistics, neuroscience, philosophy and psychology. The topics covered include Perception, Action, Learning, Language, Knowledge Representation, and Inference, and the relations and interactions between such modules. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact, and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories, and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. COGS001403, CIS140403, PSYC207403 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 105-404 Introduction To Cognitive Science TOWN 305 R 04:00 PM-05:00 PM Cognitive Science is founded on the realization that many problems in the analysis of human and artificial intelligence require an interdisciplinary approach. The course is intended to introduce students to the problems and characteristic concepts of Cognitive Science, drawing on formal and empirical approaches from the parent disciplines of computer science, linguistics, neuroscience, philosophy and psychology. The topics covered include Perception, Action, Learning, Language, Knowledge Representation, and Inference, and the relations and interactions between such modules. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact, and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories, and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. COGS001404, CIS140404, PSYC207404 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 105-405 Introduction To Cognitive Science TOWN 309 R 04:00 PM-05:00 PM Cognitive Science is founded on the realization that many problems in the analysis of human and artificial intelligence require an interdisciplinary approach. The course is intended to introduce students to the problems and characteristic concepts of Cognitive Science, drawing on formal and empirical approaches from the parent disciplines of computer science, linguistics, neuroscience, philosophy and psychology. The topics covered include Perception, Action, Learning, Language, Knowledge Representation, and Inference, and the relations and interactions between such modules. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact, and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories, and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. COGS001405, CIS140405, PSYC207405 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 105-406 Introduction To Cognitive Science TOWN 307 R 05:00 PM-06:00 PM Cognitive Science is founded on the realization that many problems in the analysis of human and artificial intelligence require an interdisciplinary approach. The course is intended to introduce students to the problems and characteristic concepts of Cognitive Science, drawing on formal and empirical approaches from the parent disciplines of computer science, linguistics, neuroscience, philosophy and psychology. The topics covered include Perception, Action, Learning, Language, Knowledge Representation, and Inference, and the relations and interactions between such modules. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact, and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories, and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. COGS001406, CIS140406, PSYC207406 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 105-407 Introduction To Cognitive Science TOWN 315 R 06:00 PM-07:00 PM Cognitive Science is founded on the realization that many problems in the analysis of human and artificial intelligence require an interdisciplinary approach. The course is intended to introduce students to the problems and characteristic concepts of Cognitive Science, drawing on formal and empirical approaches from the parent disciplines of computer science, linguistics, neuroscience, philosophy and psychology. The topics covered include Perception, Action, Learning, Language, Knowledge Representation, and Inference, and the relations and interactions between such modules. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact, and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories, and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. COGS001407, CIS140407, PSYC207407 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 105-408 Introduction To Cognitive Science TOWN 305 F 03:00 PM-04:00 PM Cognitive Science is founded on the realization that many problems in the analysis of human and artificial intelligence require an interdisciplinary approach. The course is intended to introduce students to the problems and characteristic concepts of Cognitive Science, drawing on formal and empirical approaches from the parent disciplines of computer science, linguistics, neuroscience, philosophy and psychology. The topics covered include Perception, Action, Learning, Language, Knowledge Representation, and Inference, and the relations and interactions between such modules. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact, and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories, and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. COGS001408, CIS140408, PSYC207408 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 105-409 Introduction To Cognitive Science TOWN 303 F 03:00 PM-04:00 PM Cognitive Science is founded on the realization that many problems in the analysis of human and artificial intelligence require an interdisciplinary approach. The course is intended to introduce students to the problems and characteristic concepts of Cognitive Science, drawing on formal and empirical approaches from the parent disciplines of computer science, linguistics, neuroscience, philosophy and psychology. The topics covered include Perception, Action, Learning, Language, Knowledge Representation, and Inference, and the relations and interactions between such modules. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact, and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories, and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. COGS001409, CIS140409, PSYC207409 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 105-410 Introduction To Cognitive Science TOWN 307 F 04:00 PM-05:00 PM Cognitive Science is founded on the realization that many problems in the analysis of human and artificial intelligence require an interdisciplinary approach. The course is intended to introduce students to the problems and characteristic concepts of Cognitive Science, drawing on formal and empirical approaches from the parent disciplines of computer science, linguistics, neuroscience, philosophy and psychology. The topics covered include Perception, Action, Learning, Language, Knowledge Representation, and Inference, and the relations and interactions between such modules. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact, and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories, and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. COGS001410, CIS140410, PSYC207410 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 105-411 Introduction To Cognitive Science TOWN 307 F 05:00 PM-06:00 PM Cognitive Science is founded on the realization that many problems in the analysis of human and artificial intelligence require an interdisciplinary approach. The course is intended to introduce students to the problems and characteristic concepts of Cognitive Science, drawing on formal and empirical approaches from the parent disciplines of computer science, linguistics, neuroscience, philosophy and psychology. The topics covered include Perception, Action, Learning, Language, Knowledge Representation, and Inference, and the relations and interactions between such modules. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact, and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories, and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. COGS001411, CIS140411, PSYC207411 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 105-412 Introduction To Cognitive Science DRLB 2C8 R 03:00 PM-04:00 PM Cognitive Science is founded on the realization that many problems in the analysis of human and artificial intelligence require an interdisciplinary approach. The course is intended to introduce students to the problems and characteristic concepts of Cognitive Science, drawing on formal and empirical approaches from the parent disciplines of computer science, linguistics, neuroscience, philosophy and psychology. The topics covered include Perception, Action, Learning, Language, Knowledge Representation, and Inference, and the relations and interactions between such modules. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact, and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories, and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. COGS001412, CIS140412, PSYC207412 Formal Reasoning Course Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 115-001 Writing Systems Eugene Buckley TOWN 311 MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM The historical origin of writing in Sumer, Egypt, China, and Mesoamerica; the transmission of writing across languages and cultures, including the route from Phoenician to Greek to Etruscan to Latin to English; the development of individual writing systems over time; the traditional classification of written symbols (ideographic, logographic, syllabic, alphabetic); methods of decipherment; differences between spoken and written language; how linguistic structure influences writing, and is reflected by it; social and political aspects of writing; literacy and the acquisition of writing. History & Tradition Sector Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
LING 115-201 Writing Systems DRLB 3C2 F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM The historical origin of writing in Sumer, Egypt, China, and Mesoamerica; the transmission of writing across languages and cultures, including the route from Phoenician to Greek to Etruscan to Latin to English; the development of individual writing systems over time; the traditional classification of written symbols (ideographic, logographic, syllabic, alphabetic); methods of decipherment; differences between spoken and written language; how linguistic structure influences writing, and is reflected by it; social and political aspects of writing; literacy and the acquisition of writing. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 115-202 Writing Systems DRLB 3C2 F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM The historical origin of writing in Sumer, Egypt, China, and Mesoamerica; the transmission of writing across languages and cultures, including the route from Phoenician to Greek to Etruscan to Latin to English; the development of individual writing systems over time; the traditional classification of written symbols (ideographic, logographic, syllabic, alphabetic); methods of decipherment; differences between spoken and written language; how linguistic structure influences writing, and is reflected by it; social and political aspects of writing; literacy and the acquisition of writing. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 120-001 Intro To Speech Analysis Jianjing Kuang MCNB 395 TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course focuses on experimental investigations of speech sounds. General contents include: the fundamentals of speech production and perception; speech analysis tools and techniques; and topics in phonetic studies. The course consists of integrated lectures and laboratory sessions in which students learn computer techniques for analyzing digital recordings. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
LING 170-301 Exp Approaches in Lang Gareth Roberts BENN 141 MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Controlled experiments are a key element of empirical research, and they play an increasingly important role in the study of language and communication. This course will be divided into two halves. In the first half, students will be introduced to the fundamentals of how to conduct an experiment, along with a basic introduction to statistical methods. The emphasis will be on understanding the basic logic of experimental design, but special lectures will focus on the application of particular methods to the study of language. In the second half, classes will become more like lab meetings as students develop their own experimental projects from the ground up. At the end of the semester they will write up these projects as papers. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
LING 250-001 Introduction To Syntax Beatrice Santorini COLL 314 MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM This course is an introduction to current syntactic theory, covering the principles that govern phrase structure (the composition of phrases and sentences), movement (dependencies between syntactic constituents), and binding (the interpretation of different types of noun phrases). Although much of the evidence discussed in the class will come from English, evidence from other languages will also play an important role, in keeping with the comparative and universalist perspective of modern syntactic theory. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
LING 270-001 Language Acquisition Charles Yang BENN 231 TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM An introduction to language acquisition in children and the development of related cognitive and perceptual systems. Topics include the nature of speech perception and the specialization to the native language; the structure and acquisition of words; children's phonology; the development of grammar; bilingualism and second language acquisition; language learning impairments; the biological basis of language acquisition; the role in language learning in language change. Intended for any undergraduate interested in the psychology and development of language. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
LING 300-301 Tutorial in Linguistics Julie Anne Legate COLL 315A TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This tutorial allows students to deal in a concentrated manner with selected major topics in linguistics by means of extensive readings and research. Two topics are studied during the semester, exposing students to a range of sophisticated linguistic questions.
LING 304-401 Neurolinguistics Kathryn D. Schuler TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course is an upper level undergraduate/graduate seminar in neurolinguistics. We will explore language in the brain through readings and discussions. LING504401 Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
LING 411-301 Old English Donald A. Ringe MWF 12:00 PM-01:00 PM The main purpose of this course is to teach students to read Old English ("Anglo-Saxon"), chiefly but not exclusively for research in linguistics. Grammar will be heavily emphasized; there will also be lectures on the immediate prehistory of the language, since the morphology of Old English was made unusually complex by interacting sound changes. In the first eight weeks we will work through Moore and Knott's "Elements of Grammar" and learn the grammar; the remainder of the term will be devoted to reading texts. Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
LING 420-301 Structure of A Language CANCELED
LING 495-001 Games and Signals Robin L. Clark WILL 29 TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Game Theory has provided a new way of looking at linguistic meaning, particularly pragmatics (the use of language). This course will survey the use of Game Theory in linguistics as well as develop the techniques for studying signaling behavior. We will look at the formal foundations of signaling with particular attention paid to games of incomplete information (games where even which game is being played is uncertain). This will allow us to extend pragmatics beyond Gricean conversational maxims to areas like deception and polite signaling.
LING 504-401 Neurolinguistics Kathryn D. Schuler TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course is a graduate seminar in neurolinguistics. We will explore language in the brain through readings and discussion. LING304401 Undergraduates Need Permission
Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
LING 510-001 Intro Hist-Comp Ling Donald A. Ringe MWF 01:00 PM-02:00 PM Synchronic and diachronic systems. Analogic processes. Semantic change. Effects of contact. Internal reconstruction. Comparative method and reconstruction. Undergraduates Need Permission
Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
LING 520-001 Phonetics I Jianjing Kuang MW 09:30 AM-11:00 AM Speech: its linguistic transcription, its quantitative physical description, and its relationship to the categories and dimensions of language structure and use. The physical basis of speech: acoustics, vocal tract anatomy and physiology, hearing and speech perception, articulation and motor control. Phonetic variation and change. Prosody: stress, intonation, phrasing speech rate. Phonetic instrumentation, the design and interpretation of phonetic experiments, and the use of phonetic evidence in linguistic research, with emphasis on computer techniques. Introduction to speech signal processing. Speech technology: introduction to speech recognition, text-to-speech synthesis, speech coding. This course will emphasize the phonetics of natural speech, and its connections to issues in other areas of linguistics and cognitive science. Undergraduates Need Permission
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LING 530-001 Phonology I Rolf Noyer WLNT 300C TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM First half of a year-long introduction to the formal study of phonology. Basic concepts in articulatory phonetics; the distribution of sounds (phonemes and allophones); underlying and surface forms, and how to relate them using both ordered-rule and surface-constraint approaches. The survey of theoretical topics in this term includes distinctive features (context, organization, underspecification); the autosegmental representation of tone; and the theory of phonological domains and their interaction with morphological and syntactic constituency. Emphasizes hands-on analysis of a wide range of data. Undergraduates Need Permission
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LING 550-001 Syntax I Julie Anne Legate WLNT 300C TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM A general introduction at the graduate level to the analysis of sentence structure. The approach taken is that of contemporary generative-transformational grammar. Undergraduates Need Permission
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LING 562-301 Quan Analy Ling Variat Meredith Tamminga WLNT 300C TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course provides students with the opportunity to hone their statistical, computational, and organizational skillsets while conducting original linguistic research on data gathered in continuing fieldwork in the speech community. Topics include forced alignment and vowel extraction, auditory and automated variable coding, the application of linear and logistic regression, and techniques for effective data visualization. Undergraduates Need Permission
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LING 581-001 Semantics II Florian Schwarz WLNT 300C MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM The first part of the course expands the system from LING 580 to include intensional contexts. In particular, we discuss analyses of modals, attitude verbs, and conditionals, as well as the scope of noun phrases in modal environments. The second part of the course discusses a selection of topics from current work in semantics, such as the semantics of questions, tense and aspect, donkey anaphora, indefinites, genericity, degree constructions, events and situations, domain restriction, plurality and focus. Undergraduates Need Permission
LING 603-301 Topics in Phonology Rolf Noyer WLNT 300C M 03:30 PM-05:30 PM Topics are chosen from such areas as featural representations; syllable theory; metrical structure; tonal phonology; prosodic morphology; interaction of phonology with syntax and morphology.
LING 607-301 Topics in Psycholing CANCELED Topics in Psycholinguistics
LING 630-301 Seminar in Morphology David S. Embick BENN 16 W 02:00 PM-04:00 PM Readings in modern morphological theory and evaluation of hypotheses in the light of synchronic and diachronic evidence from various languages. Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
LING 650-301 Topics in Natl Lang Synt Anthony S Kroch WLNT 300C W 10:00 AM-12:00 PM Detailed study of topics in syntax and semantics, e.g., pronominalization, negation, complementation. Topics vary from term to term.
LING 653-301 Tpcs in Syn-Sem Intrface WLNT 300C M 10:00 AM-12:00 PM Topics in the Syntax-Semantics Interface
LING 670-301 Topics in Cult Evol Lang Gareth Roberts BENN 139 M 10:00 AM-12:00 PM Readings in the cultural evolution of language. This encompasses research on the contribution of processes of cultural change to the emergence of language in the human species, the emergence of new languages, and language change viewed as a cultural-evolutionary process. There will be an emphasis on research employing empirical methods, particularly experimentation. Otherwise focus varies from term to term. Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info